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The Andalucia Bird Society  |  ABS Birding forum  |  Migration  |  Topic: Little Bustards and Stone-curlews « previous next »
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Author Topic: Little Bustards and Stone-curlews  (Read 4876 times)
Mick
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« on: August 30, 2009, 04:05:25 pm »

« Last Edit: March 13, 2010, 08:31:25 pm by Peter » Logged

Mick Richardson, Birds, Butterflies, Dragonflies, Orchids and Wildflowers in Granada Province and beyond!

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« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2009, 10:00:18 pm »

Mick,

Never really got good sightings of Little Bustard and might make a effort to get and look around the Granada area later in September. Is there a best time in the year for these birds?

Derek
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Mick
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2009, 05:56:02 pm »

Hi Derek

The main flock usually shows up in the last week of Sept or the first week of Oct.

Mick.


* Little-Bustard 1..jpg (27.2 kB, 1136x852 - viewed 854 times.)
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Mick Richardson, Birds, Butterflies, Dragonflies, Orchids and Wildflowers in Granada Province and beyond!

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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2009, 04:36:36 pm »

Hi All.

The Little Bustard flock is now starting to grow, found 72 birds yesterday sitting low in one of the Lucerne fields during an heavy rain storm.

All the best Mick.
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Mick Richardson, Birds, Butterflies, Dragonflies, Orchids and Wildflowers in Granada Province and beyond!

www.granadawildlife.com    THE WORK SITE.
www.lojawildlife.com        THE BLOG.
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Peter
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2009, 05:52:53 pm »

Hi All.

The Little Bustard flock is now starting to grow, found 72 birds yesterday sitting low in one of the Lucerne fields during an heavy rain storm.

All the best Mick.

Good to hear Mick. Will tell the Dutch rascal next door!

Peter
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« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2010, 07:28:31 am »

It is a medium-sized wader with a strong yellow and black beak, large yellow eyes which give it a "reptilian", or "goggle-eyed" appearance, and cryptic plumage. The bird is striking in flight, with black and white wing markings. Despite being classed as a wader, this species prefers dry open habitats with some bare ground. It is largely nocturnal, particularly when singing its loud wailing songs, which are reminiscent of that of curlews. Food consists of insects and other small invertebrates. It will also take small reptiles and rodents. It lays 2-3 eggs in a narrow scrape in the ground.
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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2010, 02:14:29 pm »

It is a medium-sized wader with a strong yellow and black beak, large yellow eyes which give it a "reptilian", or "goggle-eyed" appearance, and cryptic plumage. The bird is striking in flight, with black and white wing markings. Despite being classed as a wader, this species prefers dry open habitats with some bare ground. It is largely nocturnal, particularly when singing its loud wailing songs, which are reminiscent of that of curlews. Food consists of insects and other small invertebrates. It will also take small reptiles and rodents. It lays 2-3 eggs in a narrow scrape in the ground.

Hi sherlocklewis, yes I read this full article on the following link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eurasian_Stone-curlew

The full article is an excellent read.

Peter
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For great birding and wildlife tours.
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Articles are published on my blog: http://spanishnature.blogspot.com/
For day tours in 'my' area see: http://spanishnature.com/serrania-de-ronda.html
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The Andalucia Bird Society  |  ABS Birding forum  |  Migration  |  Topic: Little Bustards and Stone-curlews « previous next »
 


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