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The Andalucia Bird Society  |  ABS Birding forum  |  Your Local Patch  |  Topic: Bird/Wildlife crime « previous next »
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Author Topic: Bird/Wildlife crime  (Read 2899 times)
paulgaucin
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« on: July 17, 2014, 04:14:40 pm »

Hi all
I'm thinking of putting together a short article about the current state of bird and/or wildlife crime in Spain; I intend to concentrate on raptor persecution (including 'accidental' poisoning) but would welcome any relevant contributions such as personal experiences or other useful sources of information relating to any form of wildlife crime in Spain.
Many thanks,
Paul
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 04:24:08 pm by paulgaucin » Logged
Carlos
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2014, 10:27:10 am »

   Hello Paul.
   I have heard by a very hunter, that it's common practice when game birds are in big numbers that they don't stop hunting a particular species when they reach the maximun individuals established by law. To avoid been fined by Seprona or Guardia civil, they simply take the birds home, and then come back to the hunting area to shoot another lot - which I think must be considered a crime, e.g. when there was a huge flock of geese 4-5 years ago around DoƱana. By doing so Seprona can not detect the actual number of animals being killed.
  And I wonder, couldn't the hunters just purchase chicken in the supermarket in case hunger was the reason they go against the law? Besides, the hunting practice is more expensive than buying! It seems to me a lack of responsability and children's play. They could try shooting an apple been thrown into the air which is also very exciting.

   And here is an older story about raptors traffic, even with the Spanish Imperial eagle: http://www.20minutos.es/noticia/1097996/0/


   Good luck with the article, Paul, in case you still haven't finished it.
   Carlos.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2014, 12:55:55 pm by Carlos » Logged
paulgaucin
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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2014, 04:30:38 pm »

Hi Carlos
Thanks for that information. I have written the article about wildlife crime in Spain but I am writing another about the situation in Andalucia so any extra information is very welcome, thanks!
Best wishes,
Paul
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Carlos
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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2014, 07:49:31 pm »

  I'm glad to help with those kind of articles. I will be happy to read them when they are published.
  I am remembering now, although I don't know if it could be considered a big crime (for me it is indeed), that I was visiting an orange groove where I had spotted some blackbird nests and decided to follow them up to watch their fast development. Before they were weaned I saw other nests with little babies. I got excited as I was planning to make pics this time but sadly after two or three days all of them die suddenly. They had an unusual reddish skin. Later, I heard, that it might be due to the use of pesticides which makes sense as the nest were located in different parts of the groove so it's unlikely to be a dissease or parasites. Moreover I can tell it wasn't the heat or the lack of natural prey because I happened to have a blackbird's nest in my garden by that time, also with 3 baby birds which developed very well into fledglings.

  I wonder if the farmer knew those babies and their parents would eat a lot of snails and other insects in his groove... FOR FREE.

  Carlos.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2014, 09:16:47 pm by Carlos » Logged
Brenda
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2014, 05:45:04 pm »


Hola Carlos,

Lots of members are very angry at the use of pesticides in their areas. One member has not had any insects this year, therefore his bird numbers are really down.. He is devastated.

In the UK it is the same in agricultural areas with no birds at all.

What can we do to help the situation? Farmers seem to be very happy to use pesticides and who is going to tell them they can't use them as they are killing the local wildlife? It is a very difficult situation.

Brenda
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Carlos
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2014, 11:44:09 pm »

  Hello Brenda, I agree that it is a difficult situation.

  I think a possible solution could be conducting local research on organic farming. However true organic farming is more input-independent, so what company would be interested in that?

  Dutch company Kopper's products are still very expensive and farmers need to buy them - usually living organisms - every year. But what about handling ecosystems on a large scale? Bugs become predictable if we study them and so it could be easy to guide nature to our favour.
 
  Sometimes, it is the normal farmer work that turn an insect into a pest. For example, I heard tilling the soil kill many predatory beneficial insects. And many seem to forget the main and old reason to till the soil is to control the weeds, so grooves with adult trees wouldn't really need to be tilled. Usually it is done, however, for mere appearance reasons to avoid people think his is a sloopy groove.

   Also, the farmer could be forced to use pesticides when the fruit is to meet certain quality parameters such as not having a single vestige of pests. This time i think we could help as consumers by not being very demanding with fruit appearance but instead being better informed of its origin.

   Something like this in Spain or Andalusia would be a great idea: http://www.beyondpesticides.org/about/mission.php

   Best wishes,
   Carlos.

« Last Edit: September 04, 2014, 11:51:53 pm by Carlos » Logged
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The Andalucia Bird Society  |  ABS Birding forum  |  Your Local Patch  |  Topic: Bird/Wildlife crime « previous next »
 


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